things of little relevance


In which Lucy catches up on internet reading, about reading
January 4, 2009, 9:52 pm
Filed under: bookish | Tags: ,

A few months ago, I went through a phase when I was dead set on being a humor scholar. This period dovetailed with (and was probably spurred on by) the release of Jim Holt’s Stop Me if You’ve Heard This: A History of Philosophy and Jokes. Paper Cuts has a short interview with Jim Holt up, definitely worth a quick look-see:

“Whose books are generally shelved around yours in bookstores? How does it feel to be between them?

My book “Stop Me if You’ve Heard This: A History and Philosophy of Jokes” ends up either in the humor section or the philosophy section. If it’s humor, I’m shelved next to books with titles like “Hot Chicks With Douchebags” and “I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell,” which makes my heart sink a little. If it’s philosophy, I’m flanked by Hegel, Heidegger, Hume and Kant — which is absurd, of course, but at least I can console myself with the thought that I’m less boring than three of the four.”

As inspired by Jim Holt, new year’s resolution addendum: less internet and read Andrew Sullivan’s blog.

One of my favorite Guardian features is Writers’ rooms. A surprising number of these authors don’t actually write on computers, opting instead for longhand or typewriters. New year’s resolutions addendum #2: write less on computers. I need to make more use of my typewriter anyway.

Jonathan Safran Foer’s description of a library in Brooklyn is pretty entertaining. I tried to work at the Morningside Heights and Lincoln Center public libraries a few times. My experience at the Lincoln Center library was really horrific; the old man sitting next to me yelled at some business man for using a laptop under the premise that the library is a place for books, not computers.

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1 Comment so far
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I am going to attempt to work at the Palisades Free Library today. I don’t think it is what Safran Foer would call “real.”

Comment by Perri




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